[on Elsa and Rumplestiltskin’s relationship]
"Obviously he knows her, she knows him, something’s happened. Why else would she be in his vault?"

leonardodicrapio:

leo is chasing after that jack nicholson aesthetic like his life depends on it

we-are-the-bings:

Lana, please.

Anonymous whispered: EMMA I miss you! Other Emma was standing outside yesterday and my chickens all went flying over to her and scared her so badly lol it was kind of adorable -pirate anon

haha omg that is so cute though! I didn’t know other Emma was such a scaredy thing, I hope the chickens haven’t terrified her for life! :P

sparkellikeastar whispered: i liked some of your ouat fairytale emma icons so i can use one of them for when ouat comes back they are perfect:)

cinemagorgeous:

Alter Ego by photographer Niklas Axelsson.

likeafieldmouse:

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus’s creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

aryasnark:

Childhood Lost by Justyna Neryng

"An on-going autobiographical project, self-portraits just in a different body. Exploring the nature of portraiture and memory. I am producing a series of portraits that evoke characters that populate this world we know as childhood. A court of character’s from myths and dreams. The images are aesthetically inspired by portraiture from the Golden Age of Dutch painting.By drawing on paintings as inspiration I am hoping to give a timeless feel to the final images. Key to the project is the painstaking styling and prop building, which I am using to evoke these different persona played out by my daughter."(via)